Questions & Answers about Ragdolls and Our Cattery

Below are some commonly asked questions concerning ragdolls in general and also concerning some of our cattery business practices. If you are looking for more information specifically about the ragdoll breed, please check out our resource library. If you have other questions, please don't hesitate to contact us. We'd love to hear from you!

Is it true that Ragdolls don't shed?
Is it true that Ragdolls are hypo-allergenic?
Is it true that Ragdolls shouldn't go outdoors?
What does it mean for a kitten to be "show-quality"?
Can I come visit your cattery and see the available kittens?
What should I expect to pay for one of your kittens?
What forms of payment do you accept?
How do I purchase a Little Apple kitten?
Do you guarantee the health of your kittens?
Have you had any problems with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)?
How soon can we pick up our kitten?
Do you ship kittens?
What about vaccines?
What is your declaw policy?
Do you sell "breeder quality" kittens?

Is it true that Ragdolls don't shed?
Like most other cats, they will shed some as it warms up after a cold winter and they will shed if they are stressed for some reason (a trip to the vet, perhaps?). But we have found that they do not shed nearly as much as other long-haired cats. Their fur lacks the under layer that most long-haired cats have, meaning less shedding and no tangling and matting. Their fur is soft like rabbit fur and generally requires little to no grooming.

Is it true that Ragdolls are hypo-allergenic?
We have heard stories and have experienced ourselves what many claim to be the hypo-allergenic aspect of Ragdolls. There are members of our family with cat allergies (my husband and myself included), but our cats have not bothered us at all even though we handle them regularly. One thing to note is that many people aren't necessarily allergic to cats but to the pollens and other allergens they bring in from the outdoors. Ragdolls are meant to be indoor cats (see below) and so this could actually be a factor. We have spoken with others who have cat allergies and also have not had trouble with Ragdolls, though we cannot guarantee that this will be the case with everyone.

Is it true that Ragdolls shouldn't go outdoors?
Ragdolls are considered an indoor-only pet. They are naturally less cautious and less aggressive than other cats. This puts them at risk for injury if allowed to spend time outdoors. In addition, most ragdoll kittens will have never experienced the outdoors (having been raised inside) and this will put them at even more of a risk because they will be unfamiliar with the dangers that the outdoors may hold for them. Also, because Ragdolls can have severe reactions to certain vaccines, they are not vaccinated against some of the diseases that outdoor cats can commonly contract and pass on to other cats.

What does it mean for a kitten to be "show-quality"?
A show quality kitten is one that demonstrates the characteristics (or standards) that are looked for in a show ring. You can take any registered kitten to a show, but they are judged according to certain standards including, but not limited to, size, shape of head, ear placement, color-markings, fur quality, and personality. All of these areas are looked at and certain aspects might cause point deductions and others might cause kittens/cats to be disqualified. Our "show-quality" kittens will be picked to meet these standards giving you a better opportunity to compete well in the show halls. It should be noted, however, that these show standards are just that: "Show-standards". The show quality kittens will have what it takes to compete in shows, but our pet-quality kittens will be just as beautiful and will be great companions for those that are not interested in the show ring.

Can I come visit your cattery and see the available kittens?
Absolutely! We are pleased to have you come and visit the kittens in person so you can see what they are like before you choose which kitten you would like from a litter. We are usually available by appointment any day except Sunday.

We usually do not allow kittens under 8 weeks of age to be seen during these visits. This is to protect them as they are developing their little immune systems. Also, we would ask that anyone who has signs of being sick or having a contagious infection (for example: pinkeye, ringworm, chickenpox, etc) not to come for a visit until you are fully recovered. These are infections that our kittens can catch from you and are very dangerous for a cattery where all of our cats have a great deal of interaction with one another. While it is not our intention in any way to be rude, we do reserve the right to deny visits from someone who is obviously sick.

Click here to contact us and set up an appointment to visit.

What should I expect to pay for one of your kittens?
Our pet quality kittens are typically $850 plus a $125 early altering fee (spay or neuter). Our show or breeder quality kittens vary in price a little. Please contact us if you are interested in a show-quality or breeding kitten.

What forms of payment do you accept?
Our preferred method of payment is cash, money order / cashier's check, or Paypal. We usually do not accept personal checks, but Paypal will allow you to pay using either a credit card or checking account number.

How do I purchase a Little Apple kitten?
Please read our guide on how to purchase a kitten from us.

Do you guarantee the health of your kittens?
Yes! We allow 1 week after the time you receive your kitten to have it checked out by a licensed vet for upper respiratory infection, external parasites, and FELV/FIV. If any guaranteed health issues are found, you may return your kitten to us sometime within the first week with an explanation from the vet and we will replace the kitten with another of equal value when one becomes available.

We also have a one-year genetic defect guarantee. If the kitten is found to have a fatal genetic defect, we will replace your kitten with a new kitten when one becomes available. Again, we will require documentation of the problem from a licensed vet. The health of our cats is a #1 priority for us. Part of succeeding in breeding is paying close attention to potential health issues and breeding only ragdolls that have a clear health history and no known genetic problems.

Have you had any problems with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)?
No. All of our breeders come from lines that are consistently HCM-free. As an extra precaution, we have had every breeder DNA tested and all are double-negative for the HCM carrier gene. For those not familiar with HCM, it is a genetically inheritable disease common to main coons and ragdolls. Kittens that develop HCM can die at a very young age. Because of our DNA testing, we can guarantee that our kittens will not develop the genetic form of HCM.

How soon can we pick up our kitten?
We have the kittens altered at about 14 weeks and like to give them about a week of recovery time before travelling. Generally, they will be ready for their new homes at about 15 weeks of age.

Do you ship kittens?
Yes, we do ship kittens to their new homes! Please check out our library article about shipping and contact us if you have any questions or would like an estimate for shipping costs.

What about vaccines?
Each kitten will receive one upper respiratory vaccination at 8 weeks and then an upper respiratory booster and the rabbies vaccination at 12 weeks. Your kitten will need one more upper respiratory booster at about 16 weeks of age.

There are 3 other vaccinations that veterinarians may offer for your kitten: FELV, FIV, and FIP. We generally reccommend against giving ragdoll kittens any of these 3 vaccinations, but are especially concerned about the FIV & FIP vaccinations. Please read our article about FELV, FIV, and FIP for more information and some of the risks and benefits associated with these additional vaccinations.

What is your declaw policy?
Our current policy is to highly recommend that people do not declaw their Ragdolls. There are several reasons for this. First, unlike other cats, Ragdolls have a more gentle nature and tend not to use their claws as often anyway. Second, there are many reasons why cats have claws including defense against an attacker, grooming and cleaning, and balance among others. To remove their claws will actually impact several areas of their life. Third, there are many ways that you can maintain a cat's claws so that they will not destroy your furniture or other property. Probably the most effective and cost friendly method is to clip the claws once every other week. This is actually fairly easy to do with some instruction (ask your vet to show you how). A more challenging and costly method is to use soft paws. This is a little plastic tip that you glue on to your cat's claws. We've found that they may not like these very much and some will immediately go to work trying to get them off! But still, that is an option and may work well with your cat. Another thing to consider is that cats use their front claws in the litter box to cover up their waste. Smelly litter boxes can be a result of cats who have been de-clawed. A final reason to avoid declawing is that it can cause permanent pain for the cat if not done correctly. This is especially common for bigger and heavier cats such as Ragdolls.

Ultimately, we leave this decision up to you as the new owner but if you are leaning towards declawing, we would very strongly recommend doing some research on this before having the procedure done.

Do you sell "breeder quality" kittens?
We are focused mainly on selling good pet quality kittens who are healthy and well-socialized. We do occasionally keep back a kitten who we think would do well as both a breeder and a show cat. If you are looking for a breeder, just send us an email or give us a call and we will try to help you either ourselves or by putting you in contact with one of our breeder friends.

Didn't find an answer to your question? Just send us a note. We'd be glad to hear from you.